Free Shipping on 3 Packs or More! Satisfaction Guaranteed

If you don’t love your first packet, we’ll send you a different flavor or issue a full refund. Drop us a line at wave@oneforneptune.com — we value your input

Sharing Stories from the Deep: FisherPoets

by Nick Mendoza

fisherpoets oneforneptune seafood jerky

You’ve probably never heard of the annual FisherPoets Gathering, but this unique event, with community at its heart, has been growing in size and popularity since its founding 20 years ago. Indeed, one might raise an eyebrow at the idea of fishermen and fisherwomen from across the country ascending a stage to perform prose, music, and storytelling for three days, but sink into the essence and quality of what takes place at FisherPoets and you’ll quickly be reminded of something. Fishing, like storytelling, is as old as mankind. Subsequently, this community is very talented at both.

fisherpoets oneforneptune seafood jerky

Held each February in Astoria, Oregon, where the mighty Columbia River meets the even mightier Pacific Ocean, FisherPoets delivers exactly what the name promises—and so much more. Astoria is a picturesque coastal community with a legendary maritime history. A dozen or so venues around the town host each evening’s readings (a bit like SXSW, but also nothing like SXSW). These venues range from cluttered local bars, where rowdy patrons loudly knock their glasses in approval, to a spacious Cannery Museum, to the grand and regal Liberty Theater. All of them fill to capacity for each evening session. The performers and patrons of FisherPoets are as diverse in character as the venues that host them. On stage and in the crowd are the weathered faces and worn XTRATUF boots of fishers who have seen their fair share of rough seas and Alaskan winters. You also notice the crowd sporting their smart glasses and Patagonia vests, who made the trip out from Portland or Seattle to soak up the essence of FisherPoets. In this way, I feel the event is the best kind of coming-together of community. For many fishers, coastal-dwellers, and Tall Ship sailors that have attended the gathering for decades, this is a chance to share and reconnect with their people. They discuss last season’s catch and predictions for next year, but they also take this time to organize and stand together against existential threats to their livelihoods and the fish they depend on. This year, for example, many attendees wore “No Pebble Mine!” t-shirts and planned action against a proposed mining operation that would threaten one of the most important remaining salmon runs on earth. For the newcomers, lured in by the charm and mystique of this world, it is an opportunity to know your fishermen, and to better understand the lives of hardworking people who bring food to our table—their joys, their emotions, their trials and tribulations.

The first poem I experienced at FisherPoets, arriving late Friday night, was read by a 20 year old woman from Bristol Bay, AK, born and raised on a salmon Troller. In beautiful prose, her poem described how her fisher-mother “gave her daughters to the sea.” To this day, the hair on my neck still stands on end when I recall the last line of her poem, which asks the question: “Did my mother really give her daughters to the Sea, or did she give the Sea to us?” Those wouldn’t be the last shivers I’d feel that evening. Shortly after, there was a Coast Guard veteran with a 15 minute, heart pounding account of 7-seconds in his helicopter that were almost his last—a close call during the rescue of a cargo ship in a raging gale. You could have heard a pin—or a fishing hook—drop in the room of 200 patrons as he described the gyrations of his aircraft as its blades skimmed the surface of Force 5 seas, kissing that line at which ‘all is lost’ before miraculously stabilizing, elevating, and ascending to safety. The only thing I could hear was my own elevated heart rate, drumming behind my ears. My emotions would continue to be piqued in three dozen readings and performances I attended over the weekend.

fisherpoets oneforneptune seafood jerky

When I take a broader lens in considering why a gathering like FisherPoets is so special and so important, it brings me to a realization. These spaces, where people can come together to share openly, listen patiently, let go cathartically, and empathize thoughtfully, are increasingly rare. It breaks stereotypes, opens hearts, and all at once serves as the cement of a broad fishing community, a foundation for its persistence, and a friendly window in from the outside. There is a lesson for all of us at FisherPoets.

Nick Mendoza is the CEO and Founder of OneForNeptune, which makes healthy, sustainable white fish jerky that is traceable back to the fish, fisher, and fishery where it was caught.




Also in From The Deep

OneForNeptune Founder Nick Mendoza on Why He Believes the Seas Will Save Us
OneForNeptune Founder Nick Mendoza on Why He Believes the Seas Will Save Us

I discovered aquaculture at the right moment in my academic career and it changed my life forever. To anyone considering an education or a career in aquaculture, I hope this piece may shed light on the limitless opportunities in the sector for young, motivated thinkers from all disciplines.

Read More

Fish Jerky: How the Native Americans Did It
Fish Jerky: How the Native Americans Did It

Fish jerky seems like a product designed for modern times - healthy, high-protein, low-carb, sustainable, ethical snacks from seafood. While it may appear like another new age food trend for an increasingly health-conscious general public, fish jerky origins in the Americas date back hundreds of years. Indigenous peoples from both North and South America have been making jerky as a sustainable way to preserve their meats for centuries.

Read More

Is Fish Jerky the Protein Snack of the Future?
Is Fish Jerky the Protein Snack of the Future?

When thinking about jerky you probably aren’t thinking of the snack of the future. In fact, you’re probably convinced that those plastic-wrapped sticks of beef, turkey, bacon, or other industrialized meat will soon disappear from gas station shelves as people begin to seek healthier snack alternatives.

Read More